Miyabi Knives

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Types of knives

Miyabi knives are made of a hard steel core like VG10 steel and SG2 micro-carbide powder steel which is then covered by soft steel layers on either side. The brand equally utilizes ice-hardening technique in the making of their blades, which results in blades that are much harder and durable.

The blades of their knives usually have hardness of around HRC60. All their blades have edges ground to between 9 and 13 degree angle, which is way sharper compared to any Western or German blade out there. The brand currently has a wide catalog of different types of blades, categorized in different series which include:

Miyabi Black (5000MCD 67) Series

The 5000MCD 67 series is the most premium collection from Miyabi. The blades are made of extremely hard Cryodur micro-carbide (MC66) powdered steel core, clad by 132 additional layers of stainless steel. They have a hardness of HRC66, providing exceptionally sharp and lasting edge. The 132 layers give each blade a unique floral Damascus pattern. The blades have been hand sharpened using the traditional, three-step Honbazuke method to a 9 to 12-degree angle. The handles are D shaped, made from Bigleaf maple burl wood with a unique grain and black ash color that contrasts well with the Damascus finishing of the blades. The handles also feature half bolsters and mosaic accent pins that are complimented by steel end caps with Miyabi name engraved in Japanese. The knife types in the series include: Chef’s, Paring, Santoku, Kiritsuke, Slicing, Utility, Rocking Santoku, Bread, and Preparation.

Miyabi Birchwood (5000MCD) Series

The Birchwood series is yet another premium collection and probably the most popular knife series from Miyabi. The core of the blades is made of SG2 micro-carbide powdered steel which is one of the hardest steel out there with a hardness level of HRC63. The core is clad by 50 layers of steel on each side, making a total of 101 layers which creates a unique flowery Damascus pattern on the face of each blade. The blades have a Katana 9.5 to 12 degree edge that has been hand-honed using the traditional 3-step Honbazuke method. The series features the same Japanese D-shaped handles but made of Karelian (Masur) Birch wood with half bolsters. The handles have mosaic pin accent and two red spacers that give the knives a sophisticated look. They also feature a steel end cap, engraved with Miyabi logo. The knife types include: Chef’s, Nakiri, Carving/Slicing, Santoku, Rocking Santoku, Kiritsuke, Bread, Paring, Utility, and Preparation knife.

Miyabi Artisan (6000MCT) Series

The Artisan is yet another one of the best collection that Miyabi offers in terms of aesthetics and functionality. The blades have three years with the core made from SG2 micro-carbide powder steel and clad by a layer of stainless steel on each side. They have a hardness of HRC63 and feature true katana edges, sharpened to a 9 to 12 degree angle using the same 3-step Honbazuke process like all the Miyabi knives. Unlike the Black and Birchwood series though, the Artisan blades have a hammered Tsuchime finish which helps prevent food from sticking on them and also gives the blades an exquisite look. The knives come with hefty D-shaped handles made with special Cococbolo Rosewood pakkawood matrial that mirror the beautiful hammered blades. The handles are carefully curved /contoured at the middle to nestle comfortably in the hand. They have half bolsters and include details like brass and red spacers, as well as a mosaic pin and a decorative stainless steel end cap engraved with Miyabi’s Japanese name character. The knife types include: Chef’s, Santoku, Sujihiki, Paring, Utility, Kiritsuke, Slicing/Carving, Bread, Fine Edge Santoku, Rocking Santoku and Preparation.

Miyabi Mizu Series

The Mizu collection is pretty similar to the Artisan series. It has the same SG2 micro-carbide powder steel core (HRC63) that’s clad by a layer of stainless steel each side. The edge is the same too, sharpened to 9 to 12-degreee angle on either side. The blades also feature a hammer Tshumine finish. The key difference is the handle. The Mizu series knives feature more traditional rounded handles that are made of Micarta. They are not curved in the middle, but rather flared around the end cap. They still have the half bolsters and mosaic pin accent that are complimented by red spacers and a steel end cap engraved with Miyabi’s Japanese name character. The knife types in the series include:

Miyabi Kaizen II (5000FCD) Series

The Kaizan II series blades are made of 49 layers of steel with the core consisting of FC61fine carbide steel with hardness of HRC61. The blades have also gone through a FRIODUR ice-hardening process to ensure durability and corrosion resistance. The 49 layers give each blade a unique Damascus pattern and the cutting edges are Honbazuke-honed and symmetrical (doubled edged). Like all Miyabi knives, they are sharpened to a 9 to 12-degree angle. The handles are black pakkawood and are D-shaped with half bolsters. They have a decorative mosaic pin at the center and a steel end cap with a Japanese name character of Miyabi. Unlike the Birchwood, Artisan, and Mizu series, the Kaezen II handles feature only a single red spacer around the end cap. The knife types include: Chef’s, Nakiri, Santoku, Paring, Utility, Slicing, Bread, and Preparation.

Miyabi Hibana Series (800DP)

The Hibana series knives feature 49-layer blades with a core made of fine FC61 steel and clad by 24 alternating layers of stainless steel on either side. The Damascus pattern of the blades has been hammered to give them a sparkle image which is where the series gets its Hibana (spark, in Japanese) name from. The blades have gone through FRIODURx2 hardening process to enhance cutting performance, durability, and corrosion resistance. The edges have been hand sharpened to a 9 to 12-degree angle using the 3-step Honbazuke process. The handles are triple-riveted, made of acrylic material. They have a curved, ergonomic shape and bolster to provide a comfortable pinch grip. They feature the same signature Miyabi mosaic brass colour pin at the center and spacers. The knife types include: Chef’s, Santoku, Nakiri, Paring, Carving, Kiritsuke, Utility, Paring, Rocking Santoku, and Bread.

Miyabi 7000D Series

The blade core of Miyabi 7000D series knives is made of CMV60 powder steel which is a high-grade steel suited for demanding requirements. It’s clad by 64 layers of steel (two different types of steel that have different levels of hardness). The blades have been hardened using the CYODUR ice-hardening process, resulting in an overall hardness level of HRC60. Unlike the Miyabi collection, the 7000D series blades are honed to 19-degree angle and each has a unique floral damask pattern. The handles are sturdy and have a stylish modern look, made of Micarta and stainless steel material. They feature the traditional Japanese D shape and are rounded off with a decorative steel end cap engraved with Miyabi’s Japanese name character. The knife types in the series include: Chef’s, Santoku, Paring, Kudamono, and Utility.

Miyabi Kaizen Series

The Kaizen collection features blades made of VG10 steel core that’s clad by 32 layers of soft stainless steel on each side, creating a beautiful wavy Damascus pattern. The blades have a hardness level of HRC60 and have also gone through the CRYODUR ice-hardening process to enhance their durability, edge retention, and corrosion resistance. Each blade has been hand-hone using the traditional 3-step honbazuke process to an angle of around 9.5 to 12 degree to give them a sharper edge. The handles are D shaped and made of black linen Micarta which is accented with a mosaic pin at the center and red spacers around the bolster and the metal end cap which has the Miyabi’s Japanese character name is engraved. The knife types in this series include: Chef’s. Slicing, Paring, Hollow Edge Santoku, Utility, Hollow Edge Rocking Santoku, Straight Paring, Extra Wide Rocking Chef’s, Bread, and Preparation knife.

Miyabi Evolution Series

The Miyabi Evolution knives are quite different with regards to steel composition and blade design. They feature Western-style blades that have a clad core made of fine carbide FC61 steel with Katana edges honed to 9 to 12 degree angle using the 3-step Honbazuke process. The blades have a hardness of HRC61 are ice-hardened through the FRIODURx2 process for durability, edge retention, and corrosion resistance. The knives come with triple-riveted glass-bead-enhance POM handles that are curved for comfort and thicker around the end to prevent slipping. The handles feature a slightly larger bolster and they have neither the metal end cap nor Miyabi’s signature mosaic pin at the center. They also lack the red spacers but instead have a red lining running along the top (spine) and base of the POM handle. The knife types include: Chef’s, Paring, Slicing, Nakiri, Hollow Edge Rocking Santoku, Hollow Edge Santoku, Bread, and Preparation.

Miyabi Koh (400FC) Series

Like the Evolution series, the Koh blades are made of FC61 fine carbide steel with hardness level of HRC61 and they are equally ice-hardened through FRIODURx2 process to enhance their durability, edge retention, and corrosion resistance. The blades have hand-engraved Miyabi logo like all other blades from the company and they feature katana edges, hand-honed to 12 degree angle to deliver scalpel-like sharpness. The knives have comfortable octagon-shaped handles made of pakkawood. The unique handles have bolsters and Miyabi’s signature mosaic pin at the center. They don’t have the end cap or the red spacers seen on the other Miyabi series, but they do have larger bolsters than the rest. The knife types include: Chef’s, Paring, Hollow Edge Rocking Santoku, Slicing, Santoku, Nakiri, Bread, and Preparation.

Miyabi Fusion (600D) Series

The Miyabi Fusion collection was created in conjuction with Iron Chef Masaharu Marimoto. It’s a line that features blades made of durable VG-10 steel core, clad by 64 alternating layers of softer steels. The blades have a hardness level of HRC60 and the layers, each rolled on top of the other create a unique flower Damascus pattern on the face of each blade. The blades have also been ice hardened through the CRODUR process to ensure optimal edge retention, durability, and corrosion resistance. They feature a Katana edge, hand-sharpened to an angle of 9 to 12 degree on each side using the traditional 3-step Honbazuke blade-honing technique. The knives come with Western-style handles that are made using glass-bead enhanced POM that’s triple-riveted to a full tang. The design is quite identical to that of the Evolution series, except for the bolster which is aligned differently and is slightly smaller than that of the Evolution knives. The knife types include: Chef’s, Santoku, Slicing, Utility, Extra Wide Rocking Chef’s, Hollow Edge Santoku, Straight Paring, Honesuki Boning, Hollow Edge Rocking Santoku, and Bread.

Miyabi Red Marimoto (600S) Series

The Red Marimoto series is another of Miyabi’s line that was created in collaboration with Chef Masaharu Marimoto. The blades of this collection are made of high carbon, German stainless steel and they have been ice-hardened through the FRIODUR process to hardness of HRC57. The edges have been hand-honed to 9.5 to 12 degree angle using the 3-step Honbazuke process. Unlike all the other Miyabi’s series, the blades of the Red Maromoto series are plain with no patterns at all. The handles material and design are pretty much similar to the Miyabi Fusion series, except for the red lining running along the top (spine) and base of the handles which is not included. The knife types in the series include: Chef’s, Shoto, Utility, Santoku, Rocking Santoku, Hollow Edge Santoku, and Bread.

Price Range

Miyabi solely focuses on Japanese knives and it’s no secret that their knives are of high quality, making them a bit expensive just like Tojiro and Yaxell knives. The prices of their knives range from $50 to $500 or more depending on where you buy them. Their Santoku knives cost anywhere from $50 to $450.

The Miyabi Black (5000MCD 67) and Birchwood series are arguably their most premium collections. They have the hardest and sharpest blades that can handle any tasks. However, between the two, the Miyabi Black line is the most expensive option with prices ranging from $200 to $500 while that of the Birchwood range from $170 to $400.

A good example is the Miyabi Black 5000MCD67 7-inch Santoku knife which goes for around $399.99 while the Birchwood Santoku knife of the same size goes for $349.99. It’s the same thing with the 7-inch Rocking Santoku knives from both series with the Miyabi Black model costing $399.99 while that of the Birchwood series costing $349.99.

The Artisan, Mizu, and Kaizen series knives are also slightly expensive, with their prices ranging from $100 to $300. The Artisan 7-inch regular Santoku knife and 7-inch Rocking Santoku knife cost around $219.99 while the same knife types of the same size from the Kaizen series cost $179.99, even though they are hollow edged. The 5.5-inch Artisan regular Santoku knife costs slightly less at $169.99and it’s the same thing with Kaizen 5.5-inch Santoku knife with hollow edge, which costs $159.99.

Both the Evolution and Koh series are mid-priced (relative to the other series under the Miyabi’s brand) variants. They are almost similar in price and steel use, the difference lies in the overall design of their handles. Typically, a Miyabi Evolution 7-inch regular Santoku knife (Hollow Edge) and 7-inch Rocking Santoku knife (Hollow edge) cost around $159.99. The same knives from the Koh series costs $149.99, so it’s just a $10 price difference between the two.

The Fusion collection is a little more affordable with the knives costing $70 to $150. The Fusion 7-inch Santoku knife (Hollow Edge), for instance, costs $139.99 and its rocking version goes for $129.99 while the 5.5-inch version is priced at just $99.99. However, if you’re after saving some money or working on a tight budget, the Miyabi Red Marimoto collection would suit you best.

The price range of knives in this series is $50 to $130, with the 7-inch Santoku knife (Hollow Edge) going for $114.99 which is the same price for the 7-inch Rocking Santoku knife (Hollow Edge. The 5.5-inch Santoku knife from the series goes for $79.99, which is cheapest Santoku knife from Miyabi.

The Nakiri knives from the company are all 6.5 inches in length and just like the Santoku knives and all the over knife types, the prices vary from one series to the other, although they typically range from $120 to $350. The most expensive option is from the Birchwood series with goes for $319.99 and it’s followed by the Mizu Nakiri knife which is slightly expensive, at around $199.99.

Again, in the case of Nakiri knives, the Evolution and Koh series offer the mid-price range with the Evolution Nakiri knife going for $159.99 while that from the Koh series costs $149.99. So, you have the same $10 price difference between the two series just like the prices of their Santoku knives. Unfortunately, Miyabi currently doesn’t offer any Nakiri knife within its more affordable series. You only have the premium and mid-priced options if you’re after a Nakiri knife.

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